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Africa Yoga Project

16 Aug
Africa Yoga Project

Africa Yoga Project

Africa Yoga Project

Africa Yoga Project

Africa Yoga Project

Africa Yoga Project

Africa Yoga Project

Africa Yoga Project

The Africa Yoga Project organization uses the transformative power of yoga to empower communities and change lives. By inspiring the global yoga community into active service, we deliver effective and innovative programs that foster peace, improve physical, emotional, and mental wellbeing, facilitate self-sufficiency, and create opportunities to learn and contribute across the communities of East Africa.

viaVision & Mission | Africa Yoga Project.

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Yoga proves to reduce depression in pregnant women, boost maternal bonding

15 Aug

Prenatal yoga

It’s no secret that pregnancy hormones can dampen moods, but for some expectant moms, it’s much worse: 1 in 5 experience major depression.

Now, new research shows that an age-old recommended stress-buster may actually work for this group of women: yoga.

Pregnant women who were identified as psychiatrically high risk and who participated in a 10-week mindfulness yoga intervention saw significant reductions in depressive symptoms, according to a University of Michigan Health System pilot feasibility study. Mothers-to-be also reported stronger attachment to their babies in the womb.

The findings were published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice.

“We hear about pregnant women trying yoga to reduce stress but there’s no data on how effective this method is,” says lead author Maria Muzik, M.D., M.S., assistant professor of psychiatry and assistant research scientist at the Center for Human Growth and Development. “Our work provides promising first evidence that mindfulness yoga may be an effective alternative to pharmaceutical treatment for pregnant women showing signs of depression.

“This promotes both mother and baby wellbeing.”

Mental health disorders during pregnancy, including depression and anxiety, have become a serious health concern. Hormonal changes, genetic predisposition and social factors set the stage for some expectant moms to experience persistent irritability, feelings of being overwhelmed and inability to cope with stress.

Untreated, these symptoms bear major health risks for both the mom and baby, including poor weight gain, preeclampsia, premature labor and trouble bonding with the new baby.

While antidepressants have proven to effectively treat these mood disorders, Muzik says, previous studies show that many pregnant women are reluctant to take these drugs out of concern for their infant’s safety.

“Unfortunately, few women suffering from perinatal health disorders receive treatment, exposing them and their child to the negative impact of psychiatric illness during one of the most vulnerable times,” Muzik says. “That’s why developing feasible alternatives for treatment is critical.”

Evidence suggests women are more comfortable with nontraditional treatments, including herbal medicine, relaxation techniques and mind-body work.

Yoga continues to grow in popularity but in the United States, many classes concentrate on yoga as “exercise,” omitting the practice of being fully present in the moment and aware, authors say.

Meanwhile, mindfulness yoga – which combines meditative focus with physical poses – has proven to be a powerful method to fight stress and boost energy.

For the U-M research study, women who showed signs of depression and who were between 12-26 weeks pregnant participated in 90-minute mindfulness yoga sessions that focused on poses for the pregnant body, as well as support in the awareness of how their bodies were changing to help their babies grow.

Funding for follow up work on this subject was recently provided by a grant from the Institute for Research on Women and Gender.

“Research on the impact of mindfulness yoga on pregnant women is limited but encouraging,” Muzik says. “This study builds the foundation for further research on how yoga may lead to an empowered and positive feeling toward pregnancy.”

viaYoga proves to reduce depression in pregnant women, boost maternal bonding.

Bikram Yoga: 30 Day Challenge

2 Aug

Bikram Yoga: 30 Day Challenge [May 2011] from Think Loco! on Vimeo.

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Why All Olympians Are Yogis

2 Aug

Credit: Career Upshift

Like many Americans – I get excited to watch the Olympics. I laugh, I cry, my heart pounds! I find myself looking at these athletes and being inspired by their ‘yogic qualities.’

Their hearts are wide open. No matter how many times they lose (and they must lose a lot) – they lead life with their heart. They don’t close off when they are down. They go out time and time again and open to grace. Their stories are epic; how they got to the Olympics, their life path. Each one has a unique journey.

Each one has to believe in themselves. Sure we all experience negative self-talk, but Olympians have to create a space in the mind to believe in themselves. They have to be their own biggest fans.From that place of strength they rise to greatness.We already know: Yoga is a practice of the mind. We use the physical to access the mind. The Olympics appear to also be a physical practice. But above all, being an athlete in the Olympics means having a strong mind-body connection and a strong mind.

When looking at the 8-limbed path of yoga – four (half) of the limbs are directed at the practice of the mind. Two limbs are physical (pranayama and asana) and two are ethical practices (yamas and niyamas). As an Olympic athlete we could create a similar ‘8-limbed path’; 1) Strength 2) Grace 3) Speed 4) Breath Control 5) Perseverance 6) Focus 7) Drive 8) Surrender, Contentment and Bliss.

As a life-long student and teacher of yoga, I see the practice everywhere.  It’s pure beauty to witness.  Above all, whether you are a world class athlete or on your mat, the practice can guide you to your best self, one step at a time.

viaWhy All Olympians Are Yogis.

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MC Yogi Pilgrimage CD

1 Aug
Mc Yogi - Pilgrimage

Mc Yogi – Pilgrimage cover

“I’m just a working class mystic,” shrugs the enviably laid back MC Yogi, grinning a little as he adjusts his trademark fedora, kicks up his Adidas and cranks the volume on ‘Give Love,’ an instantly addictive track off his stunning dance-floor grenade of a new record, Pilgrimage.

You may have heard his 2008 debut, Elephant Power, a certified phenom that still hovers near the top of the world music charts. The album’s extraordinary success earned Yogi invitations to play in clubs and yoga festivals all over the world. But now the time has come for the next phase, and Pilgrimage is definitely it. The album’s influences are all over the musical map: world beat, hip-hop, Bollywood, reggae, dance hall, house, dub. Chaotic street sounds of India blast through the mixes, alongside madhouse beats, old-school turntable scratches and popping horns over which Yogi effortlessly drops his rhymes. It’s all so hook-laden and sun-blasted you can’t help bobbing your head and aching to find a dancefloor.

“Everything went into this record,” says Yogi. “It’s a sonic trip, a journey toward the Self, toward what the yoga masters call the Supreme Soul.” Wait. Hip-hop and yoga? The Ramayana with a backbeat? Stories of Shiva and Shakti, Ganesh and Hanuman and the rest of the ancient Hindu gods, all funked up and slamming up against potent, propulsive graffiti beats custom built to drive eager listeners into a divine frenzy? Indeed. “Pilgrimage is a full, authentic, cosmic yogic experience on the dance floor,” exclaims Yogi. The truth is, you’ve never heard anything like Pilgrimage.

Track Listings:

1. Vanakam

2. Ganesha (Sound the Horn)

3. Born to Fly

4. Temple Drums

5. Hanuman

6. Jai Sita Ram

7. Breath Control

8. Arunachala

9. Shiva (Supreme Soul)

10. Renegade Rickshaw

11. I Am That

12. Temple Light

13. Sacred Fire

14. Shedding Skin (Beloved Friend Edit)

15. Pranam

16. Sun Light

17. Pilgrimage

18. Vanakam (Reprise)

19. Give Love

viaMC Yogi Pilgrimage CD.

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Moksha Yoga: A Hot Path To Great Health And Vitality – Evolving Wellness

30 Jul
moksha yoga

Moksha yoga

While yoga has been a known practice for thousands of years in many parts of the Eastern world, it has just started to become a widely practiced phenomenon in the Western world in the last decade or so.

Today, there are numerous yoga styles out there, as many teachers who personally identified with it, evolved it into their own version. And while the names may be different, in essence and at its core, yoga is yoga. The differences are apparent in the pace it is done at, the sequence of postures, and the environment it is done in. Thus, there is a yoga style that is sure to please everyone.

My personal experience with yoga has been dabbling in some poses from time to time, informally at home. That was until I was recommended to try Moksha Yoga.

While the poses may be similar to many other yoga types, what separates Moksha Yoga from the rest, is that it is done in the heat and with a specific style that follows a very beneficial sequence for a total mind, body and soul health experience.

Thus, as this month Evolving Wellness hosts a special theme on the practice, exercise and benefits of yoga, in this article I will share with you my experience with Moksha Yoga and the tremendous benefits associated with it.

The History of Moksha Yoga

Moksha Yoga is a form of hot yoga that was created by Ted Grand and Jessica Robertson in 2003.

The vision of the above two individuals, who were both well trained in yoga, has since grown into a worldwide community with classes in Hong Kong, Taipei, England, Trinidad, Singapore, Thailand and across Canada and the USA. See here for Moksha Yoga world locations.

Moksha Yoga includes a group of independent hot yoga studios committed to ethical, compassionate and environmentally conscious living. The Moksha community is strongly rooted in environmentalism. Each studio is required to meet compulsory environmental standards. Collectively they strive to communicate that the benefits of yoga are limitless and accessible to all.

Moksha means “release” or “liberation.” It is with this message that each class takes you through a series of strengthening and toning postures in the detoxifying calm of a heated studio. The yoga is done usually in an environment of about 40 degrees Celsius, and a humidity ranging around 30-50%.

Moksha Yoga studios offer “Karma Classes” which are done on a donation basis, they also offer an “Energy Exchange” program where time volunteered at the studio allows for unlimited yoga and many special events. Each Moksha teacher undergoes rigorous training that is being acclaimed worldwide.

Moksha Yoga has also developed a partnership with the Arthritis & Autoimmunity Research Centre Foundation to develop a national campaign entitled, “The Power of Movement.”

My History With Moksha Yoga

In expressing a desire to begin to practice yoga regularly, I was recommended by a friend to check out Moksha Yoga. Knowing very little about yoga, I just thought it was the name of a particular yoga studio, not realizing that it is an amazing Canadian-based yoga company that is growing in reputation and popularity by the day, world wide.

I heard about it in March, and sadly it took me until the end of November to try my first class. I have been hooked on it ever since however, making it almost 6 months straight of practicing Moksha Yoga, on average 3 times per week.

My only “regret“, is not having started sooner, as I am now moving out of the area, and moving to an area where there is no Moksha Yoga studio nearby. However, wherever I travel I will always keep an eye out for Moksha studios, to do a class whenever I can. I trust and love what they stand for, and it just feels SO good!

The studio I had the pleasure of attending was the Moksha Yoga Burlington location, and its energy was just phenomenal! From the owners to all the teachers I had the pleasure of meeting, it is perhaps one of best experiences one can have when tuning the mind, body and soul. A beautiful environment, for a beautiful practice.

Over these past 6 months, it has been absolutely incredible watching my body transform, as I activate and tone muscles I almost never knew I had. The relaxation, flexibility and detoxification benefits have also been amazing!

With any hot yoga studio, one has to consider the cleanliness and sanitary conditions. This is where Moksha also excels, as they have every detail covered. From sustainable cork flooring to triple filtered water. There are no carpets or other similar materials, which is extremely important when the temperatures are turned up and sweat is literally pouring into it daily. There are also no chemicals used, whether for cleaning or other tasks and most studios run on Bullfrog Power – 100% green electricity.

Being a “green” oriented line of studios was also an important aspect for me, as today I choose to support with every decision I make and dollar I spend, companies that have the environment  and sustainability in mind. I was thoroughly impressed with how the Moksha studios operate on every level!

The Benefits of Moksha Yoga

The benefits of hot yoga are numerous, and perhaps too many to list here, so I will just outline some of the major ones.oksha

First, there is of course the actual benefits of yoga. Whether done in the heat or under regular temperatures, the postures work to enhance the balance, tone, endurance, flexibility and strength of the body. In the heat, this happens even better, as the muscles are warmer and thus allow for a greater range of motion.

Yoga also has incredibly relaxing properties, teaching us how to breathe properly, slow down our thoughts and merge closer with the core of our being. Thus, it is a true treat for the mind and soul!

Secondly, as there is an immense amount of heat, sweating is inevitable. This provides for an incredible and very necessary detoxification. Proper breathing alongside this, also accelerates the release of toxins from within our body. The lymphatic system is stimulated and the immune system enhanced. There is also the added benefit of sweating and burning calories, which can result in weight loss.

There are also of course, as with any physical movement cardiovascular benefits. Movement, muscle use and proper breathing strengthen the heart and enhance many aspects of our cardiovascular system.

Moksha yoga is extremely beneficial for the musculo-skeletal system. Whether you have back pain, muscle weakness, or bone loss, the variety and type of postures can promote healing and necessary strengthening.  Ultimately, it provides for an amazing, total body workout.

Moksha Yoga has also been acknowledged for improving sleep, increasing energy levels and simply promoting a better overall feeling.

Lastly, Moksha Yoga provides for numerous other physical, mental, emotional and spiritual benefits. Which benefits you experience, will depend on your personal needs. You can read about more of the benefits associated with Moksha Yoga here.

Conclusion

In the end if you have never tried yoga, and are still wondering what all the hype is about out there, I invite you to check out a yoga studio near you. Allow yourself to walk in with an open mind and heart, and feel the benefits that it has for you on so many different levels.

If of course you are lucky enough to have a Moksha Yoga studio in your area, and are open to trying yoga the hot way, immerse yourself in its benefits for your health and vitality today, and all your tomorrows to come.

No matter where I am, Moksha Yoga will always be a part of me!

viaMoksha Yoga: A Hot Path To Great Health And Vitality – Evolving Wellness | Holistic Optimal Health.

What I wish I had known as a Bikram yoga beginner

27 Jul

Just here. Just now.

There are the classic do’s and don’ts that every hot room newbie hears, as they nervously prepare for their first class. It’s usually about setting up, drinking water and where to leave their sweaty rental towel.

But the practice of Bikram yoga is full of subtleties that I wish I had known when I got started. Here are just a few of them:

~ Sweat is sexy. I know you think it’s gross. But it’s so not. Sweat means passion. Dedication. Hard work. Health. It’s hot. Seriously.

~ Don’t worry about getting into better shape or getting more flexible before you come to your first class. We were all kinds of broken down messes when we first came. Fitness and flexibility come from going to class. Just start where you are.

~ Don’t set up in the front row on your first class, but stagger your mat so that you…

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Blood evidence, Yoga reduces our stress level

26 Jul

yoga anti-stressResearchers at the University of Los Angeles have shown that yoga would have a biological effect on the health of persons under chronic stress. These findings were published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, 14 July 2012.

A previous research conducted in Pittsburgh in April 2012, had already shown that chronic stress cause a weakened immune system and could increase the occurrence of recurring health problems.

Here, researchers from the University of Los Angeles wanted to know if meditation has a biological effect on the immune disturbances of stressed individuals.

So they selected 45 people who take care of a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease. These people, in whom there is constant stress, regularly develop depressive symptoms, emotional distress, and have a decreased energy.

Every day for eight weeks, participants divided into two groups, had to do a meditation session of 12 minutes, either by practicing yoga, or by isolating itself to listen some relaxing music.

At the beginning of the experiment, a blood test had revealed that they all had high levels of inflammatory markers in the blood. These substances are released into the body when subjected to an aggression threatening its integrity.

After eight weeks of daily meditation, their rates had declined in samples of the group practicing yoga .

In fact, scientists believe that this relaxation method would influence the expression of certain genes, themselves responsible for the disruption of the immune system by stress.

They bring by blood evidence that yoga can reduce and control anxiety, what fans of the practice had advocated already long!

viaLe yoga réduit notre niveau de stress, la preuve par le sang : Allodocteurs.fr.

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Is Yoga Popular?

24 Jul

If you were to Google “Yoga popularity” you will find pages upon pages of articles talking about the popularity of yoga. So the question this article asks is: Is yoga really popular? The answer that this post comes up with may surprise you.

Before we jump into answering this question we should clarify by what we mean by yoga. In this article the practice of yoga asana or the yoga of postures is referred to as yoga. The practice of all 8 limbs of yoga as defined by Patanjali would reduce the numbers of yoga practitioner to be quite marginal.

Let us look at the raw numbers. As per Yoga Journal survey in 2008 there are about 16 Million people practicing yoga in the US. This translates to about 5% of the population. If we were to take this number world-wide we have to first eliminate half the population. It was estimated in 2005 that about half the world lived in poverty at less than $2.50 per day. For the people fighting a daily battle to bring bread on the table yoga is not on their list of priorities. We then have to accept that yoga has poor penetration in China, most of Africa, and Middle-East. Even in India, the asana yoga practice is not very popular and it would be safe to say that the popularity is no greater than that in the US.

If you were to do the math you will probably conclude that no more than 2% of the world does yoga. Even this is probably a wild over-estimate. So the question then arises: can we claim that something practiced by 2% of the population as popular?

The point of the article is not to stir up controversy or engage in a mindless statistical exercise. The point is to illustrate the work ahead. Because of the low penetration of yoga the benefits to society has been on the margins. Yoga can help bring down healthcare costs and also improve productivity of the working population. Yoga can also help improve education. It is not difficult to imagine that reduction of anxiety and stress can greatly improve learning. The resulting benefits from improvement in education to society would be quite phenomenal.

Yoga can also help pacify and calm down society. If yoga were to be practiced by 90% of the population you may see the need of less policemen and jails. And as yoga spreads to a majority of countries you may even see a reduction in wars and conflict.

Unfortunately the practice of yoga within the “at risk” community is pretty insignificant. Thus the people who can benefit most from yoga are not the ones practicing it. This is why the tangible benefit to society from yoga has been marginal at this point and that is why work done by people like Lisa Danylchuk is so important.

It has been close to 100 years since Krishnamacharya started his epic quest to popularize yoga and we have reached about 2% of the population in that time. Even if we were to see a geometric increase in the number of people practicing yoga, we are talking about many decades before yoga reaches say 25% of the population world-wide. It is probably only at such levels that we should first start seeing direct benefits accrue to society. When this happens that would be a “tipping point” for yoga. An earlier post talked about the foundation of sacrifice on which yoga has spread. What this post is trying to say is that Krishnamacharya’s work remains unfinished. Only when society sees direct benefit accrue to itself, only then yoga teachers will be justly compensated. Till then the wagon of yoga will have to be pulled by the force of sacrifice.

viaIs Yoga Popular? | MyLifeYoga.

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This yoga is really popular! Ce yoga est vraiment populaire!

23 Jul
Popular yoga-Yoga populaire

Yoga in India by Catmousses

Getting the Hang of Anti-Gravity Yoga

19 Jul

yoga anti gravity

I am sitting inside a silk sling suspended three feet off the floor, feeling like a caterpillar in a giant orange cocoon.

I’m trying out an anti-gravity yoga class, a type of body work that’s been gaining popularity since being featured in The New York Times and O Magazine, and showcased to the TV masses when Pink took to the air during her 2010 Grammy performance.

The instructor directs me and about a dozen other students to use our hands to draw back the edges of the colorful silk slings, which are 9 feet wide and attached to pulleys bolted to the ceiling. We comply and end up sitting on the fabric like a swing — and then swinging. I’ve practiced yoga for years — and this is definitely not your traditional yoga class.

Hard-core yogis and yoginis would probably balk at even using the word “yoga” to describe this form of exercise, which combines modified yoga poses with movements from Pilates, acrobatics and core strength training.

Anti-gravity yoga was created by Christopher Harrison, a competitive gymnast turned professional dancer who worked on Broadway and in movies such as Footloose before running an aerial performance company in the 1990s. He discovered yoga while looking for relief for his ailing, aging joints and then started mixing it with dance and aerial movements to create what he refers to on his website as “suspension training.” His company, AntiGravity Inc., offered classes to the public for the first time in 2007, and he credits the regime with helping him through a 10-month recovery from Lyme disease the following year.

Since then, Harrison has helped several dozen anti-gravity yoga franchises open in U.S. cities such as New York, San Francisco and Salt Lake City, and internationally in places such as Mexico City, Montreal, Dublin and Phuket, Thailand.

My class is at Gravitas, a Portland studio that offers anti-gravity yoga along with other new forms of body work, including “hot” yoga, taught in an infrared room that heats the people but not the space, and gyrokinesis, a Pilates-type exercise system developed by an ex-ballet dancer that focuses on spinal movement.

The 75-minute anti-gravity yoga workout is equal parts disconcerting and fun. It’s disconcerting because the first time you walk into the studio, it’s easy to feel intimidated by those silk hammocks, which you spend most of the class sitting inside, grabbing onto or hanging upside down from. But it’s also fun, because once you get acquainted with the basics — and stop caring how you look — it’s a blast.

My anti-gravity class begins with a series of stretches inside silks meant to get students relaxed and ready for harder work. We move through a sequence of increasingly difficult poses, including variations of the classic yoga sun salutation, lunge, warrior and triangle poses, using the silk as a belt-type support to intensify the stretches.

Then it’s time to go upside-down. Remember the inversion racks and anti-gravity boots that were popular in the ’80s? I think of them as I pull myself into a monkey pose, hanging upside-down with my legs bent, ankles and feet wrapped tight around the silk and my head and the backs of my hands resting on the ground.

Anti-gravity yoga is touted as being beneficial for people with back issues because using the sling as a prop takes pressure off the spine. I’ll vouch for that, but that doesn’t mean it’s always comfortable or easy. The practice includes lots of challenging core strength work, including grabbing the silk between outstretched hands and pushing it out in front of me as I lean forward into a modified plank pose, then repeating it again and again.

After class, I’m slightly dizzy, a normal reaction for a beginner who’s not used to spending that much time upside-down, as the instructor explains. The dizziness wears off by the time I drive home, and I find myself plotting when I can squeeze in another class.

viaGetting the Hang of Anti-Gravity Yoga – SecondAct.com.

 

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Acro-Yoga – A more masculine yoga?

17 Jul
Acro-Yoga

Photos: Acro-yoga Montréal

Everyone knows yoga, the Millennium discipline practiced by millions of  worldwide followers. But do you know the acro-yoga, this blend of acrobatics and yoga?

Unlike the traditional form of yoga that is practiced alone, this variant of modern times involves two partners minimum who perform different movements together. Many figures imply the presence on the ground of one of two practitioners, which becomes the “base” and supports the weight of his partner who becomes the “flyer“.

These are two Montrealers Jessie Goldberg and Eugene Poku who invented in 2001 this hybrid discipline that attracts a wide audience, including men. “It is true that the acro-yoga captivated many men, because some exercises require that one who is on the ground can raise his partner, which requires some physical strength, said Jill Campbell, a professor at Acro Yoga Montreal. But it should certainly not summarize the acro-yoga with the notion of physical exertion, acro-yoga is primarily a way to find balance, move in space with a partner or more while focusing on synchronizing the breath with that of his partner. ”

When looking at some movements of acro-yoga, one quickly realizes the difficulty of the exercise and the importance of teamwork. “It is a discipline that is anything but selfish, each practitioner has with her ​​partner a dependent relationship very strong with time, Jill Campbell says. We must be attentive to the other. ”

But if physical force is a factor in the practice of this new discipline, the meditative spirit of yoga and the values ​​of harmony are not set aside. “When doing acro-yoga, it is important to be in the moment, which means being aware of what one feels, the reactions of our body, communicating with his partner.”
Many acro-yoga practitioners are already familiar with disciplines where the body plays an important role as the circus, tai chi chuan, dance, as is the case with Aurelie, practicing dance since many years and who has just discovered the acro-yoga. “What I particularly like in the acro-yoga is this is a mix between yoga, gym and circus, we play a lot about balance, concentration and self-confidence, but also confidence in a partner that knows no bound. In addition, unlike a yoga session at the end where you feel relaxed and zen, with the acro-yoga we’re pretty super excited and energized. ”

For Jill Campbell, the benefits of acro-yoga are felt even when the course is finished and working closely with a partner resonates in the lives of every day. “We have noticed that people who practice regularly feel an overall improvement in their confidence in themselves, they develop a sense of contact with others both verbal and physical. They less feel barriers and communicate more easily, I would also say they have one certain joy of life ».

viaAcro-yoga – Un yoga plus masculin?.

Related :
Acro Yoga by Equinox

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Technology: The future of wind power is it to fly?

15 Jul
Éolienne "cerf-volant"

Éolienne volante de Joby Energy – Crédit photo : © jobyenergy.com

Stronger than onshore and offshore wind: wind wheel … Two U.S. companies propose to overcome the problems associated with wind power, mainly the low productivity and heavy material requirements, by developing a kind of deer-flying capable of producing electricity. Crazy idea or promising project?

Clean and renewable, wind power is one answer to the energy challenge that humanity faces. Unfortunately, it suffers from defects and must wipe critics more or less justified that hinder its development and sometimes question: first, productivity already relatively low, is totally dependent on the continuity and the intensity of the wind. The use of alternative energies is often necessary.

Then, the installation of a mast requires a lot of material and the carbon footprint of the operation is not always very positive (especially if you count the break). Finally, the wind turbines are accused, whether on land or at sea, of generating an eyesore in the landscape, even a noise that could disturb nearby homes.

However two U.S. companies may have found the solution to make wind more productive, cheaper, and less annoying…

Wind turbines of the future

Joby Energy and Makani Power has indeed had the idea to pick up where the wind is steadier and stronger: at altitude. Also, these companies come to present wind prototypes like kites that would amount to more than 400 meters to capture more substantial and more powerful gusts. Result: productivity doubled (the current is routed to the ground via cables that would retain).

Another plus, material costs would be drastically reduced (no work). Makani Power believes that its machine would be five to ten times cheaper than a conventional wind turbine. And Joby Energy Announces spending 20 times less.

These innovations offer the added advantage of being easily moved, allowing to follow the winds  and respond to potential visual or audible nuisance complaints.

The first products should be marketed in 2015. To be continued …

viaTechnologie : L’avenir de l’éolien est-il de voler ? | Developpement Durable.

 

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Namaste! San Francisco International Airport introduces yoga room

14 Jul


SAN FRANCISCOStressed out by flying?

Travelers in Northern California can now find their inner calm in the Yoga Room at San Francisco International Airport.

The quiet, dimly lit studio officially opened last week in a former storage room just past the security checkpoint at SFO’s Terminal 2.

Airport officials believe the 150-square-foot room with mirrored walls is the world’s first airport yoga studio, said spokesman Mike McCarron.

The room, open to all ticketed passengers, contains a few chairs and yoga mats but no instructors or televisions. No shoes, food, drinks or cell phones are allowed.

“Silence is appreciated,” says a sign spelling out “Yoga Room Etiquette.”

A prominent blue-and-white sign with a Buddha-like pictogram beckons visitors: “Come check out our Yoga Room.”

Frequent flyer Maria Poole accepted the invitation, practicing a downward dog asana and other yoga poses before boarding her flight.

“It’s perfect,” said Poole, 47, of Lafayette. “I think it should be in every airport, especially the terminals that I fly through. This would be such a great way for me to get my exercise in, get a little peace and quiet — a little Zen moment.”

The Yoga Room is just the latest example of how airports are trying to improve the passenger experience and showcase their regional culture, noting the ancient practice’s popularity in the San Francisco Bay area, said Debby McElroy, executive vice president of Airports Council International-North America.

In recent years, airports have upgraded their food and shopping venues and added massage parlors, nail salons, dry cleaners and pet hotels, McElroy said, but SFO is the first to add a yoga room in North America and probably the world.

“I expect other airports will be looking at whether a yoga room at their airport makes sense,” McElroy said.

SFO officials say the idea came from a passenger who checked out the newly remodeled terminal last year and told Airport Director John Martin it was lacking one thing: a yoga room.

Martin, a long-time yoga practitioner, agreed. Airport managers spent $15,000 to $20,000 to turn the storage space into the yoga studio.

SFO officials had to design the Yoga icon after they couldn’t find one in the international guide of airport pictograms that direct travelers to taxis, restrooms and baggage claim carousels.

Lindsey Shepard of Fremont, who was traveling with Poole, said she liked having “a dark place to chill out and have a timeout and relax.”

“Flying can be stressful,” Shepard said. “It’s nice to have something to do at the airport besides sit around and eat bad food and read magazines.”

Of course, the Yoga Room isn’t for everyone.

“If I got into yoga, I might lose track of time and miss my flight,” said Robert Diaz, 52, of Seal Beach, who was visiting San Francisco with his wife. “I’d be so relaxed.”

viaNamaste! San Francisco International Airport introduces yoga room – NY Daily News.

airport yoga room

Source: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images North America

 

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Yoga Food – Eat Like a Yogi

10 Jul

How do lessons learned on the mat translate to pleasures of the table?

Yogi food

Yogi food – Photo By Joe Coca

Go on. No one’s looking.

Just take a quick peek inside the kitchen of Ayurvedic educator and yoga teacher Scott Blossom’s Berkeley, California, home. In the pantry you’ll find ghee and sunflower-seed butter, plus dozens of herbs, spices, and teas. In the fridge, bundles of kale, carrots, and beets. On the counters, jars of homemade jams, organic raw honey, and a warm loaf of sprouted spelt bread. On the stovetop a pot of dahl (Indian lentil soup) simmers.

All of these foods reflect Blossom’s quest to meet his nutritional needs while honoring his yogic values. He spent almost 20 years experimenting with veganism, vegetarianism, and other dietary styles, while studying Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine, before figuring out the right diet for himself and his family. In 1998 he settled on an Ayurvedic diet in which his daily food choices reflect the needs of his individual constitution, what’s going on in his life, and the season of the year.

Eating is perhaps the single most important act for one’s yoga practice,” Blossom says, “because nourishment of the body’s tissues forms a foundation for nourishment of the mind and emotions.” One way to think about this is to imagine devoting your days to practice while feeding yourself nothing but sugar and caffeine. What effect would that have? It’s easy to see that a balanced, calm mind is much easier to come by if you commit yourself to nourishing your body properly, just as you commit yourself to asana, pranayama, and meditation. But what exactly does it mean to nourish yourself properly? Just how do you eat like a yogi?

The Diet of Patanjali

Admittedly, extending your yoga practice to the dinner table is not an easy task, mostly because the classic yogic texts such as Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra and the Bhagavad Gita don’t list any specific foods for following a “yogic diet.” And even if they did, it’s highly unlikely that the foods prescribed in India thousands of years ago would be appropriate today for each and every one of us.

But while there is no prescribed menu for yogis, there is a yogic diet, says Gary Kraftsow, the founder of the American Viniyoga Institute. “These are ingredients that enhance clarity and lightness, keeping the body light and nourished and the mind clear,” he explains. In other words, a diet that offers your body a great basis for practice—or encourages the same effects as practice—makes for a great yogic diet.

In the Ayurvedic tradition, foods that are considered sattvic include most vegetables, ghee (clarified butter), fruits, legumes, and whole grains. In contrast, tamasic foods (such as onions, meat, and garlic) and rajasic foods (such as coffee, hot peppers, and salt) can increase dullness or hyperactivity, respectively. But maintaining a diet that keeps your body light and your mind clear doesn’t necessarily mean eating only sattvic foods. What is best for you and what in the end will best support your yoga practice is informed by your constitution (known in the Ayurvedic tradition as vikriti) and your current state (prakriti), Kraftsow says. “Both need to be considered,” he adds.

In this way of thinking about nourishment, what you need as an individual may be very different from what someone else needs. And what you need at this moment in your life may be very different from what you needed five years ago or will need five years from now. Perhaps the ancient sages were relying on wisdom when they chose not to lay down a yogic diet for all to follow. Just as you learn to listen to your body on the mat, so you must listen to your body at the table.

Beyond the basic needs of the body, many modern yoga practitioners suggest that a yogic diet should take into account the values and philosophical teachings of yoga. Many people name ahimsa, the yogic precept of nonharming, as an influence on their dietary choices—although how they put that principle into action varies. Just as different styles of yoga teach different versions of the same poses, and different teachers offer different, even contradictory, interpretations of the Yoga Sutra, so do yogis consider a wide range of possibilities in exploring a yogic diet. But while personal interpretations may vary, there is a consensus that exploring a yogic diet is important. “For yogis, food choices reflect personal ethics,” says Blossom. “They are inextricable from our spiritual development.”

Or, as Jivamukti Yoga cofounder David Life says, “Not everyone can do Headstand, but everybody eats. Because of this, what you eat has more impact and matters more than whether you can stand on your head.”

With this in mind, we asked several well-known teachers and self-described foodies how they arrived at their current food choices. Because different yogic values resonate with people in a variety of ways, everyone had their own ideas about what constitutes a yogic diet. But what these yogis can all agree on is that their yogic principles have strongly influenced how they feed themselves.

Value Meals

When she was 21 years old, Anusara Yoga instructor Sianna Sherman became a vegan as part of her practice of ahimsa. For seven years she followed an animal-free diet, including two years on a macrobiotic diet, which consisted largely of whole grains, fresh and sea vegetables, nuts, beans, and fermented foods. Sherman spent several more years experimenting with a raw food diet for its promise of increased vitality and prana (life force); at another time she followed Ayurvedic dietary principles.

Somewhere down the line, though, Sherman, who spends much of the year on the road, discovered that she needed a different kind of fuel to support her body as she devoted herself to teaching others. She found that to keep her energy up, she needed to step away from strict diets and simply listen to her intuition.

That intuition, Sherman says, has her eating a lot of grains, vegetables, some fish, and milk. She now mainly eats organic, local, seasonal whole foods. “I try to eat close to my food sources so that the gap from earth to kitchen table is bridged with greater gratitude and awareness,” she says. “My choices are not only about serving myself but also serving the earth and the world in an authentic way.”

Ana Forrest, the founder of Forrest Yoga, also began her exploration of the yogic diet by focusing on ahimsa. “I was very attracted to vegetarianism and the philosophy of nonviolence for years, but the diet made me sick,” she says. “I’m allergic to grains. I gain weight, my brain shuts down, and my bowels stop working. And my yoga practice does not improve.”

So with her body screaming for a different regimen, Forrest chose an omnivorous diet, one that consists mostly of meat, especially game, and vegetables. But, she says, this doesn’t mean she can’t practice ahimsa. “Since I do eat animals,” she says, “I honor the elk, buffalo, or moose by not wasting its life force or mine. I use that force to heal myself and others, and to teach, inspire, and help people evolve. My ethics about what to eat came down to my personal truth. Eating in a way that impairs your health and thinking is immoral. And the truth is that an omnivorous diet physiologically works for me.”

As an Ayurvedic practitioner, Blossom views the occasional red meat as medicine for his specific constitution. He still follows a largely vegetarian diet, though: “That’s what nourishes me in the most balanced way,” he says. And when he does eat meat, he sources it with great care, choosing only organically and humanely produced meats.

Not surprisingly, the interpretation of ahimsa is widely debated within the yoga community. Life, for example, has been committed to an animal-free diet for decades. He became a vegetarian in the 1970s; since 1987 he has been a vegan. “One’s suffering is another’s suffering,” says Life, who actively encourages yogis to see veganism as the only dietary choice that truly honors ahimsa. “In the Yoga Sutra, it doesn’t say be nonharming to yourself or people who look like you. It just says do no harm.”

Freedom Food

Clearly, with such varied perspectives on what feeds the body and spirit, developing a diet that reflects your ethics and honors your physical needs can be challenging. In the end most yogis would agree that part of the practice is to develop awareness about what you eat. It’s worth spending time educating yourself not just about the possible diets you could follow but also about the origins and properties of the food you buy. And it’s essential to listen to yourself so that you’ll know what kinds of foods might serve you best in each moment. But, as you explore the parameters of your own yogic diet, allow for some flexibility. “Remember, yoga is about freedom, including freedom from your own strong beliefs and ideas,” Kraftsow says. “So don’t get caught in them.”

For example, Blossom recalls that once, while traveling to a yoga event, the only food he could find was fried artichokes with ranch dressing. “Instead of wrinkling our noses,” he says, “we prayed over it. And it was deeply nourishing.”

To begin forming your yogic diet, think about which teachings best resonate with you and how you might put those teachings into action. If ahimsa is a focal point in your value system, explore how your food choices can cause the least possible harm to yourself, other beings, and the planet. If you are attracted to the principles of bhakti yoga, you may want to make every morsel an offering—silently give thanks to the food as you prepare it and offer it as nourishment for the Divine in everything before you eat it. Or if you’re focusing on compassion for others, you may want to emphasize sharing fresh, home-cooked meals with friends in need. “When you get all these factors in alignment with your personal value system,” Blossom says, “that is the yogic diet.”

viaYoga Journal – Yoga Food – Eat Like a Yogi.

Other articles:

Why you should drink warm water and lemon
Yoga proves to reduce depression in pregnant women, boost maternal bonding
Blood evidence, Yoga reduces our stress level

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World Competitors Stretch to Prove Yoga Is a Sport

8 Jul
Juan Manuel Martin-Busitil

Juan Manuel Martin-Busitil of Spain won the men’s championship. There were 75 competitors from 24 countries at this year’s tournament. By SARA BECK

LOS ANGELES — Silence prevailed during the yoga asana routines of the ninth annual Bishnu Charan Ghosh Cup — except for one distinct sound: the low engine rumble of airplanes lifting off and landing at the Los Angeles airport.

This international competition has made the noise of momentum, too, but just where it is heading is hard to predict. Will it become a sport recognized on the Olympic stage as Rajashree Choudhury, the founder of USA Yoga and the International Yoga Sports Federation, hopes? Or is it destined to remain a quirky transplant from India practiced by an exclusive set of Bikram yogis?

“All are welcome here,” said Choudhury, the wife of Bikram and a five-time national champion in India. “We need as many yogis and styles as possible to make this dream a reality.”

The event was held at the LAX Radisson, where the mirrored ballroom became a competitive yoga stadium and runway-like hallways morphed into warm-up rooms for yogis. Onstage, a garland-draped image of Bishnu Ghosh, Bikram’s guru, looked on while seven judges sat with pencils raised, critiquing the routines.

“The quality of the athletes has evolved tremendously,” said Jon Gans, an organizer and former judge of the event. “Postures, like peacock, that seemed to be a pinnacle pose the first year would now seem normal.”

The Bishnu Charan Ghosh Cup in 2003, before the federation took the reins, was a Bikram affair. The sprawling Staples Center featured hundreds of yoga vendors, and the competition got lost in the merchandise. Fewer than 10 countries were represented, and it is said that Bikram lost a quarter-million dollars.

Though the event is more focused now — and often serves as a platform for yogis to tell their stories — the number of competitors has grown. At a Friday night dinner, Choudhury welcomed the 75 competitors from 24 countries.

Throughout the weekend, Bikram’s monogrammed Rolls-Royce sat at the hotel’s entrance, and he remained front and center, changing his outfit six times over the weekend. One silver sequined jacket, said to have inspired Michael Jackson, sparkled so much that one female competitor confessed that it distracted her onstage.

At first, Choudhury avoided the word “competition,” urging the participants to accept whatever happened with humility and a smile.

“Shine on that stage,” she said. “That should be your mantra. …There are no rivals, only fellow coaches.”

But later she compared the Ghosh Cup to other sporting events, and the ethereal gave way to the mundane.

Mary Jarvis, a coach of seven world champions, reported last-minute changes in the grace score methodology. When coaches politely grumbled about the late notice and lack of organization, Jarvis said, “This is a work in progress.”

Competitors had three minutes to complete five compulsory poses from the Bikram beginner series and two optional poses, which typically came from the advanced series. Judges considered the posture’s degree of difficulty and “how well the body reveals the therapeutic benefits of the practice.”

The national anthem kicked off Saturday’s qualifying round, but little else resembled an Olympic event except for the impressive athletic ability. Judges were paraded on stage in cocktail dresses, events ran up to two hours behind, and the 800-person ballroom was sometimes half empty. The online viewership throughout the weekend exceeded 10,000 hits.

Ten men and 10 women moved from Saturday’s qualifying round to Sunday’s finals, including seven Americans. The United States, with a developed network of studios, presented four representatives from the highly attended national competition, while others, like China, sent only one, and she lives in Boulder, Colo.

Bishnu Ghosh’s granddaughter, Muktamala Mitra, said Americans seemed more ambitious in their practice. “They struggle more and are harder working,” she said.

Rumors that someone might attempt a one-handed, bowlegged peacock, a pose that judges say would have been unimaginable nine years ago, spread throughout the hotel. It was performed by Dipannita Mondal, 17 the girls youth division winner from India.

The Ghosh Cup’s role is to build momentum for yoga asana, providing an “I can do that, too” energy among observers, particularly young ones. Of the 13 competitors in the youth division (11- to 17-year-olds), five were from India, and three were siblings from Canada.

“When I first started two years ago, I couldn’t straighten my knees in a forward bend,” said Toby Killick, 13, who placed fourth. “Everything was pretty sad, you could say.”

A few of his friends find it cool that he can do backbends, and another joined him for class once, but threw up in the hot studio after guzzling too much water.

“I warned him, but it takes some getting used to,” Killick said.

Participants from India, where yoga competitions have been around for a century, swept the youth competition, drawing gasps from the crowd as they bent like rubber into their postures. They hustled on and off the stage, sometimes with more than 30 seconds to spare.

“They are very shy,” Choudhury said, noting that some are from rural villages and most do not speak English. “I bring them to the West to teach them about performance.”

When she competed in India, she said, the audience would bang pots and pans to cause distraction, not unlike what an opposing team does during the pressure-filled moment of a free-throw shot. In the ballroom, the M.C. encouraged silence before promising the audience a lifetime of psychological torment if their cellphones went off.

The men’s finals featured a surprising number of falls, something Choudhury chalked up to mental stress. The American champion, Jared McCann, placed third after slipping from his handstand scorpion into a full wheel.

Gloria Suen, 35, from Singapore, took the women’s gold medal with a full standing bow, her arms spread wide like airplane wings. Juan Manuel Martin-Busutil, 33, from Spain, won the men’s title after pressing into an inverted palm tree that mirrored the landscape outside.

“Being upside down is a way to suspend my mind and let go,” he said. “But yoga is also my tangible grasp on reality.”

Will competitive yoga asana lift off as a sport as gracefully as the champions’ bodies did on stage? Time will tell. Among the duties of the champions is to travel the world promoting and demonstrating yoga asana.

“Every one of you is making history, and evolving this sport,” said Joseph Encinia, of the United States, the men’s world champion last year. “We’re doing well, but we’re not at an Olympic level yet.”

viaWorld Competitors Stretch to Prove Yoga Is a Sport – NYTimes.com.

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With YogaLab, we associate the benefits of yoga and music

6 Jul

What is it?
An idea of Marco Prince (yes, yes, the lead singer of FFF and, for younger children, the juror of the show “New Star” in France) and Mika de Brito (yoga teacher internationally recognized for its sensory approach). The principle? Do yoga in immersive sound, with headphones glued to the head to balance physical and connect to our emotions quickly.

How is it?
Effective: the sound, rhythm, frequencies of music affect parts of the brain (brain waves) and amplify the benefits of yoga. Resourceful.

It is for me?
This is a yoga for stressed people, pressed and others who are treated for being superative . A yoga to learn to do good, to take time for yourself, to disconnect.

It’s good for what?
Choices: to strengthen (the PowerLab), to realize (the FocusLab), to appease (the MeditationLab) or for fun (the EmotionLab).

With what?
An outfit where you feel comfortable. The rest is provided.

viaAvec le YogaLab, on associe les bienfaits du yoga et de la musique – Le lotus en musique – Beauté – Le Figaro – Madame.. (IN FRENCH)

 

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Hot Fitness Trend: Karaoke Yoga »

6 Jul

Looking to get out of a fitness or weight loss rut? You might want to check out one of the breakout fitness trends of the season; Karaoke Yoga!

For those of you that love dance based workouts, karaoke yoga might be perfect for you. The New York Daily News reports that Los Angeles-based yoga instructor Jennifer Pastiloff devised the class by enlisting the aid of DJ Gina Mooring. They created a one-hour “joy-based” yoga-singing class that has attracted a hearty following of students — and plenty of media buzz.

“If you’re looking for a strict, alignment-based yoga class, don’t come because this isn’t one of them,” Pastiloff told Relaxnews. “This is about having the workout of your life, singing, dancing, and feeling silly.” The benefit, she says, is not only opening your body through yoga but feeling connected to the other students through the process of group singing. “People are starved for connection in the world, and this class can offer that.”

The affordable, fun classes come complete with a television screen for song lyrics, and you can expect group renditions (no solos) of popular hits by Elton John, Journey, Michael Jackson, Adele, and the Beatles.

Want to give karaoke yoga a try? The classes will be available in major cities later this year.

viaHot Fitness Trend: Karaoke Yoga » Real Style Network – Beauty.

 

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Joseph Encinia – Demonstration at 2012 USA Yoga Asana Championship

2 Jul

 

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Comfort Zone Vs Improving / Zone de confort Vs Amélioration

29 Jun
Yoga schema - Comfort zone Vs Progression

From Bikram Yoga Montreal

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27 Jun

Nice skeletons! / Beaux squelettes!

Alison Hinks Yoga

all images from Science Photo Library.

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1st Montreal Yoga Music Festival 2012 – July 14 & 15

19 Jun

Festival Yoga Montréal

Saturday and Sunday July 14 and 15 for those interested!

For more info: Yoga and Music Festival

Namasté

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Hot yoga in pants or shorts?

17 Jun
Tree Pose

Tree Pose by Nicole Megarry

It’s summer, it is hot and therefore more during the hot yoga practice. It has often been used to adopt a minimalist attitude by wearing shorts to feel lighter but here are several reasons to stay in capris:

1 – Absorbs sweat: if puddles of sweat form on the carpet, then it can become slippery, and you may go deeper into your poses while your muscles are not ready or even fall.

2 – Give the grip: there are poses such as the tree where a body part is supported on the leg. The fabric of your pants will provide adhesion to achieve greater success.

3 – Guard covered: the baggy shorts are fine but they can offer a view of your “assets” at any time when you raise your leg. If you opt for small tight shorts, they can move and show more flesh than you would like.

Everyone has their preferences for hot yoga clothing, but the wearing of pants will not give you warmer than wearing shorts while preventing injuries. So pants are a safer choice!

Namasté

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The three rules to follow in yoga

14 Jun

PENSEE POSITIVE

1 – COMPLIANCE WITH THE LIMITS

Easy to say, less easy to apply. There are two kinds of limits. That which we impose and the actual limits of the body. Generally, when one imposes limits it’s either we are afraid, or we are unmotivated or not really interested in progress in our practice. For example: think you can not improve because you are not flexible enough. Such limits may be exceeded and the practice of yoga can help them do that.

In contrast, the actual limits are limits that must be respected if there is a risk of injury. For example if you just leave a wrist surgery, you should allowed a sufficient time to heal before starting to do a headstand!

So for yoga if we follow the real limits of our bodies we are less likely to get hurt. The challenge then is to know when our limits are set by irrational thoughts or real need to go slow.

2 – POSITIVE THINKING

Sure it sounds cliché, but positive thinking is very important. When we practice yoga, the mind is a true sponge wishing to absorb everything within his reach. If you have even a single negative thought during practice, this negativity is going to interfere in every cell of your being and will manifest itself physically or emotionally.

Have you ever met a yogi with an attitude defiant, angry or nervous? Certainly, any person may be at some point but people who are highly irritable or aggressive should be careful not to reinforce what may be neglected. Let go, get rid of anxiety, anger and negativity will make space for the many benefits of positive thinking on health.

3 – SELF-CONFIDENCE

Whether you practice yoga because it is fashionable or other reasons, you must have a minimum of confidence in you. Without it, you’ll pass near the goal and deny you the benefits of yoga. If you break this rule, you will have little or no progress in mastering the connection between body and mind. By cons if you trust yourself, you will understand the needs of your body and can take better care of your health.

Namasté

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Let’s strike a pose! / Hop, on prend la pose!

14 Jun
Yoga pose

Inspiring

Petite pause yoga…

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And if I put my electronic yoga outfit?

13 Jun
Tenue de yoga électronique

The Move par Electricfoxy

A new outfit designed by Electricfoxy emits a little sound as soon as we do our positions badly, thus avoiding despite our good will, unfortunate injuries. It is equipped with four elastic bands and sensors that can determined in what position the body is being placed. If something is wrong and “dangerous”, the device lets us know and locate the exact problem area. After exercise, if we plug our devices (smart phones and tablets) it provides more details including schematics representing us.

But be careful with this toy that could put you in awkward positions. Do not push beyond your limits! Nothing replaces a good yoga teacher.

http://www.electricfoxy.com/move/

Namasté

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Plains filled!

12 Jun
Plaines d'Abraham

PHOTO KARL TREMBLAY

After the huge yoga session in New York,  it was the turn of Abraham’s Plains.  Sunday june 10th,  over 300 people were there for a first success! Claire Vinel, yoga teacher and organizer of the event is sure to repeat the experience next year.

Namasté

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Hot Yoga, ok but what should I bring and how should I dress?

12 Jun

Yoga towel

You can find the accessories required for the practice for rent at Yoga studio. It is available at lower cost (about $ 2): towels, mattresses, water bottles. Personally I prefer to get my stuff and if you forget one of them, the renting is perfect.

It is advisable not to wear jewelry or perfume and it’s better to be dressed with a light and comfortable tank top, a shirt, pants or shorts. The shoes will be left at the entrance of the studio.

After practice, you will find everything in the locker room to freshen up, a shower, some body cream, a hairbrush …. so no excuses, just take your matt!

Namasté

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It’s time for yoga practice!

12 Jun

Hotyoga-Boire

BEFORE HOT YOGA CLASS

We always advise to drink at least 1.5 liters of water the day before practice or you may get dehydrated quickly because of sweating.
Especially avoid eating at least 2 to 3H before the class starts and arrive before the beginning of the session to register, change, relax and allow the body to warm up before exercise. If you suffer from an illness or injury, inform the instructor.

DURING HOT YOGA CLASS

The breath control is essential. Always inhale and exhale through the nose except during phases of relaxation where you can exhale through the mouth. The trick is to always stay calm, focused and avoid unnecessary movements! For the first time, you may feel dizzy, have hot flashes or just need a break, it”s is normal. The hot yoga is a very demanding exercise for your body and requires several practices to tame the regular rhythm. At this point, sit down and rest by staying in the room. Of course you can drink as much water as necessary.

Namasté

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The benefits of hot yoga

10 Jun

Practicing Hot Yoga helps to maintain good health and its benefits are many:

  • Relieves back pain, headaches, muscle and joint aches : reduces symptoms of chronic diseases
  • Improves posture and alignment of the spine
  • Also improves the circulation of fluids
  • Allows rapid removal of toxins through sweating and rapid elimination of fats
  • Harmonizes the functioning of organs and body systems
  • Prevents disease by strengthening the immune system
  • Reduces stress
  • Limits the effects of aging
  • Tones the muscles
  • Refines the silhouette
  • Reinforces self-confidence

Namasté

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Different types of “hot yoga”: Moksha vs Bikram

10 Jun

Maybe have you asked yourself: “What type of hot yoga do I practice?” or “What is the difference between Bikram yoga and Moksha yoga ?”. Here is the answer!

WHAT IS  BIKRAM YOGA?

Le yoga Bikram est un style de yoga dérivé du Hatha yoga. Si vous avez la curiosité de l’essayer, il est préférable que vous cherchiez à suivre un cours certifié proche de chez vous ou si vous êtes casanier, un livre ou une vidéo qui vous aidera progressivement à plonger dans le monde du Bikram.

Bikram yoga is a style of yoga derived from Hatha yoga. If you are curious to try it, it is preferable that you follow a certified course near you or if you are a homebody, a book or video that will help you gradually into the world of Bikram.

Founder

Bikram Choudhury

Bikram Choudhury, Bikram yoga founder

Bikram Choudhury was born in India where he used to practice yoga every day until he immigrated to the U.S. in the 70s. He then joined the “Yoga College of India” in Los Angeles and decided to create its own form of yoga now more commonly known as Bikram yoga. Today, Choudhury goes around the world and teach Bikram yoga to individuals as well as famous huge classes. You can also find his writings in a book on Bikram yoga and more than 400 franchise schools located around the globe.

Postures

A Bikram yoga class is designed to help us evolve through a sequence of 26 positions developed by Choudhury. Choudhury developed this series of positions in order to increase blood pressure and facilitating the flow of blood in each body part. The sequence is performed using the classical positions of Hatha yoga such as the position of the eagle, the triangle or the tree. Choudhury claims that the practice of these positions in a specific order will warm and stretch muscles, ligaments and tendons and will facilitate muscle tone as well as overall health.

26 positions - Yoga Bikram

Heated room

A classic Bikram yoga session is practiced in a room heated to 101 Fahrenheit degrees. Choudhury said that the heat from the room helps to warm the body before the start of practice, this allowing our muscles to relax and become more flexible. Bikram yoga enthusiasts acknowledge that the practice in a heated room helps cleanse our system by releasing all the toxins gradually as you train and then sweats. The heated room must allow you to work more deeply, however be careful of not hurting yourself!

Bikram classes

Bikram yoga classes are given only in studios affiliated with the “Bikram Yoga College of India“. You must be careful that the Bikram Yoga teacher is certified by the college. All Bikram yoga class lasts for 90 minutes and is suitable for both beginners and enthusiasts. Then each adapts to his own abilities and level of comfort.

WHAT IS MOKSHA YOGA?

Moksha Yoga is a relatively new discipline which is also related to hot yoga. This is two yoga instructors in Toronto who invented it. Moksha Yoga is a series of 40 postures practiced in a heated room and there are three levels of lessons, each lasting 60 to 90 minutes.

The series of regular postures begin with a resting pose that is practiced usually at the end of yoga, relaxation posture savasana. Then there are standing poses, another posture savasana, then poses on the ground to strengthen and stretch the muscles of the lower body. The session ends with savasana posture. By cons there may be some variation in the order of the series standing and / or on the ground. This type of yoga has several “dog upside down” postures, while Bikram yoga hasn’t.

Like other types of yoga, Moksha Yoga is beneficial for stretching and toning muscles, improving flexibility, calming the mind and detoxifying the body.

Moksha Yoga, in addition to individual benefits it can bring, is a practice that was designed for the sake of social consciousness : building ecological studios, assistance to the local community.

IN CONCLUSION

Moksha Yoga is a bit more flexible with regard to the sequence changes, the different types of courses and durations of training. So you can find yourself with different Moksha yoga lessons according to the teacher.

Namasté

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What is « hot yoga »?
The benefits of hot yoga
Hot Yoga, ok but what should I bring and how should I dress?
Hot yoga in pants or shorts?
What I wish I had known as a Bikram yoga beginner
Moksha Yoga: A Hot Path To Great Health And Vitality – Evolving Wellness
 

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What is “hot yoga”?

9 Jun

yoga

The term “hot yoga” is used to represent any form of yoga practiced in a heated room. The room should generally be maintained at a temperature between 95 and 105 Fahrenheit degrees. Some studios even go beyond the average. In most cases,  “hot yoga” is a quick series of postures “asanas” dictated by the teacher. As you can imagine, an intense session of yoga performed under high temperature warms up, stretches the ligaments and muscles and makes you sweat profusely. That said, it’s worth it!

Namasté

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